Memories: And Personal Stories

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Larry Stone, Class President 

Prior to high school I had lived in Kirkwood, Missouri and attended school there up through the 7th

 grade at which time my family moved into the Rockwood School District.  There I began the 8th grade in the old building behind the high school in Eureka.  At the time, I remember feeling anxious about my new environment and being the new kid in school.  However, it was not long before those feeling subsided and I began to really like the idea of being in a much smaller school where it was possible to know most of the people in my class.  Unlike the huge school district I had come from, at Eureka the possibilities for me to participate in activities and even compete in varsity sports was exciting.

 

By the time I moved over to high school the next year, I had fully adjusted to my new surroundings and life felt normal again.  The next four years seemed to fly by and then we were all seniors.  Suddenly, the reality that high school would soon be ending brought back those haunting feelings of anxiety.  Now the future had to be considered and I needed a plan. I made average grades in school so the prospect of going to college really didn’t appeal to me at that time.  However, the war was escalating in Vietnam and my parents were painfully aware that, if I didn’t go to college, I would almost certainly be drafted.  Under pressure, I decided to give college a try.

 

June 1964 arrived, graduation came and went, I enrolled at a local community college, lived at home and my life was miserable.  All of my friends from high school had scattered to the four winds and I was unhappy.  I suffered through two years of misery and poor grades until one morning in the summer of 1966 when I took matters into my own hands.  I decided that I had had enough so I got up, told my mother I would be back later, drove directly to the military recruiting facility and enlisted in the United States Navy.  When I left the recruiters office that day, I felt as if the weight of the world had been lifted from my shoulders and that I was about to embark on a great adventure.  My parents nearly fainted when I told them what I had done but at least I was happy again.

 

I arrived at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center in October to begin my great adventure, otherwise known as boot camp.  As anyone who has had that experience will tell you, it is a sobering experience.  Enough said.

 

After basic training, I was ordered aboard the USS Valley Forge, an amphibious assault helicopter carrier stationed in Long Beach, California.  We deployed to Vietnam for nine months and returned to Long Beach in August 1968.  Shortly thereafter, I was ordered to school at The Naval Training Center in Memphis, TN.  Little did I know but my life was about to change, big time.

 

Since I had not been home for almost two years, I took two weeks of leave on my way to Memphis to see my parents.  While I was home a friend of mine asked me to go to breakfast one Sunday morning with him, his fiancé and her roommate.  That is what is known as a blind date.  Anyway, I agreed and that morning my life changed forever.  I had recently traveled halfway around the world and back on my great adventure only to return to the point of beginning to find the love of my life.  Yes, I met my beautiful wife of 45 years less than five miles from where I had started my journey and I was hooked.

 

Upon completion of my training, I was ordered to Oceana Naval Air Station near Virginia Beach, VA and the following year Helen and I were married.  We lived in Virginia Beach until my enlistment was up in the summer of 1970 when we moved back to St. Louis to begin civilian life.

 

In 1972 our first daughter, Heather, was born as we were settling into home, career and me going back and graduating from college.

By 1978 my career took us to Kansas City where we lived until 1981 when we were transferred back to St. Louis..

 

Once again, in 1988, my career brought us back to Kansas City where our second daughter, Emily, was born in 1990 and where I eventually retired and we now live.  Our first daughter, Heather, graduated from the University of Kansas School of Business and received her masters degree from Butler University in Indiana.  She and her husband Greg have three children, Braden who is 10 and twin girls, Rowan and Presley 7.  They live and work in the Kansas City area.  Emily, our second daughter, graduated from Saint Thomas Aquinas High School and completed her undergraduate and graduate degrees in Accounting at Saint Louis University.  She lives in St. Louis and is a CPA with PWC.

 

Life has been good to me because I was blessed to meet the girl of my dreams at a moment in time when I was emotionally ready.  I had already experienced many things in a short period of time and I had matured enough to know what I wanted and what I needed to be happy.  Since retirement, I have more time now to pursue my hobby of restoring and showing my two classic 1967 Camaros and to watching my three grandchildren grow up and to play sports.  Now that we are finally empty nesters, Helen and I plan to travel more and just relax.

Mel Allison

In answer to, “What is the funniest thing that ever happened while you were at E. H. S.,” I has to be:

 

In Physics class during a demonstration of static electricity using a Van de Graaff Generator, Mr. Buddemeyer places his hands on the generator globe.  Mike Gaut got behind him and shorted out the static electricity between Mr. Buddemeyer's bald head and a chrome ball used to ground the electricity.  The result was about a 12 inch long electrical charge jumping off his head to the chrome ball.  Everyone was laughing, but I think Mr. Buddemeyer was laughing the hardest.

 

Response to the other questions posed, assumes that I had a clue about what the world was about.  I did not and I did not care that I did not care.  Ms. Johnson would have loved the wording of this statement!

 

As a high school student I loved to learn, as long as studying was not required. I was never opposed to hard work, but studying was not fun work.  Having fun, learning, playing sports, and meeting my wife of 49 years were the highlights of my career at E. H. S.  Going to Eureka High was one of the great joys of my life. School was an opportunity to do as you pleased and have fun, and I did. A combination of the small classes, ample sports programs, and extra-curricular activities were available to everyone. I was even in the band until Ms. Hartman hinted it would be better if I did not come back the following year. As I took High School Physics with Mr. Buddemeyer, I developed a deep appreciation for the physical sciences.

 

I never looked at my future, until the last month or two of my senior year. I ask Larry Stone what he was doing after graduation, he was going Meramec Community College, so I applied. Later I asked Glenn Scheel where he was going. He was going to Rolla, and he explained what engineering schools were all about. That even sounded better. I applied and but did not get a notice of acceptance until August, at which time all dormitories were full, requiring me to live independently. This scared the hell out of me. At a beginning of the year orientation to the engineering school was held in a large auditorium. The speaker announced; shake hands with the person on each side of you, because by the next semester they will have flunked out. I was sitting between Woody Dorrell and Jim Ziegenmier. Not good!

 

As I headed off to Rolla, I had assumed college would be a continuation of High School; WRONG. Since I had never studied and believed studying was not necessary, life was difficult. After a period time I developed study skills and course work became more applied and I was back to enjoying learning. In my entire life I have never stopped enjoying learning. While at Rolla, I married Cheryl Wisby in 1965.

 

After graduating with Bachelor Degree in Civil engineering, I accepted an engineering position with the State of Illinois in the field of hydrology and hydraulics designing flood control projects, mainly in the Chicago Area.  After 33 years of service I retired  in 2002.  Cheryl and I live in a small town (Riverton) just outside of Springfield, Il.  We have three children, all went to School in Riverton. I was a member of the School Board for two terms.  The oldest (Dan) received his Doctorate from the University of Illinois in Molecular and Cellular Biology, Garett works for Fox Television in Hartford, Ct., Tyler is in his last year of a fellowship in Pediatric Neurology at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas, City, Mo.  We have two grandsons and one brand new granddaughter. Cheryl and I travel a lot, I drop her at a mall near my  research location and I do genealogy.  Cheryl and I plan on attending the 75th reunion or anything in between.

Janet Dockery Kourik, Keep of the Memories

In answer to, “What is the funniest thing that ever happened while you were at E. H. S.,” I has to be:

 

In Physics class during a demonstration of static electricity using a Van de Graaff Generator, Mr. Buddemeyer places his hands on the generator globe.  Mike Gaut got behind him and shorted out the static electricity between Mr. Buddemeyer's bald head and a chrome ball used to ground the electricity.  The result was about a 12 inch long electrical charge jumping off his head to the chrome ball.  Everyone was laughing, but I think Mr. Buddemeyer was laughing the hardest.

 

Response to the other questions posed, assumes that I had a clue about what the world was about.  I did not and I did not care that I did not care.  Ms. Johnson would have loved the wording of this statement!

 

As a high school student I loved to learn, as long as studying was not required. I was never opposed to hard work, but studying was not fun work.  Having fun, learning, playing sports, and meeting my wife of 49 years were the highlights of my career at E. H. S.  Going to Eureka High was one of the great joys of my life. School was an opportunity to do as you pleased and have fun, and I did. A combination of the small classes, ample sports programs, and extra-curricular activities were available to everyone. I was even in the band until Ms. Hartman hinted it would be better if I did not come back the following year. As I took High School Physics with Mr. Buddemeyer, I developed a deep appreciation for the physical sciences.

 

I never looked at my future, until the last month or two of my senior year. I ask Larry Stone what he was doing after graduation, he was going Meramec Community College, so I applied. Later I asked Glenn Scheel where he was going. He was going to Rolla, and he explained what engineering schools were all about. That even sounded better. I applied and but did not get a notice of acceptance until August, at which time all dormitories were full, requiring me to live independently. This scared the hell out of me. At a beginning of the year orientation to the engineering school was held in a large auditorium. The speaker announced; shake hands with the person on each side of you, because by the next semester they will have flunked out. I was sitting between Woody Dorrell and Jim Ziegenmier. Not good!

 

As I headed off to Rolla, I had assumed college would be a continuation of High School; WRONG. Since I had never studied and believed studying was not necessary, life was difficult. After a period time I developed study skills and course work became more applied and I was back to enjoying learning. In my entire life I have never stopped enjoying learning. While at Rolla, I married Cheryl Wisby in 1965.

 

After graduating with Bachelor Degree in Civil engineering, I accepted an engineering position with the State of Illinois in the field of hydrology and hydraulics designing flood control projects, mainly in the Chicago Area.  After 33 years of service I retired  in 2002.  Cheryl and I live in a small town (Riverton) just outside of Springfield, Il.  We have three children, all went to School in Riverton. I was a member of the School Board for two terms.  The oldest (Dan) received his Doctorate from the University of Illinois in Molecular and Cellular Biology, Garett works for Fox Television in Hartford, Ct., Tyler is in his last year of a fellowship in Pediatric Neurology at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas, City, Mo.  We have two grandsons and one brand new granddaughter. Cheryl and I travel a lot, I drop her at a mall near my  research location and I do genealogy.  Cheryl and I plan on attending the 75th reunion or anything in between.

Dave Workman

As I look back on my time at Eureka High School, some of my fondest memories are of the teachers that I had.  I wasn’t the greatest of students but all the teachers seemed to tolerate me.  I never could quite get the hang of typing in Mrs. Gudermuth’s class.  I think she felt my pain and would  send me down to the filling station to wash her car during class.  Ms Hartman seemed excited when I first took band.    We had an old saxophone that my older cousin played.  I had just gotten braces and every time I tried to play, the reed would vibrate my braces.  Ms Hartman very diplomatically told me that she thought 7th hour PE would be a better fit for me. 

 

And I will never forget Mr. Buddemeyer’s class.  He was one of my favorite teachers.  I vividly remember the incident that Melvin told about and how the cat skin on Mr. Buddemyer’s head stood straight up.  But probably the worst thing I did was in Ms Pierce’s geometry class.  She had a sphere that we used in class and one day before she came in I tried to palm it and dropped it.  We quickly tried to glue it together and put it back on the stand.  When she picked it up in class, it fell apart.  My conscience got the best of me and I had to fess up.  I remember her saying how disappointed my mother would be.Of course, sports were a big part of my life and I admired the coaches that I had at EHS. 

 

Coach Bobbitt, the junior high PE teacher, was a real inspiration to me.  He allowed me to play basketball even though I was probably the worst one on the team.  Coach David also had a big influence on me.  And I had great respect and regard for Mr. Jones.  He always acted like he was in a fog but really knew what was going on and tried to let us have fun without getting away with too much.

 

After graduation, I went to Meramec Community College and played basketball.  I transferred to Missouri State and finished my degree in industrial management.  Judy and I got married in 1968 after she graduated and she taught in the Springfield school system while I finished up.  After graduation, we moved back to Eureka.  By the time my draft notice caught up with me, I had to report for duty in two days.  Leaving my wife and 3 month old son was probably the hardest thing I ever had to do.  Nothing in my life up to that point prepared me for the army or Vietnam.

 

After getting out of the army, I went into business with my dad.  Over the years, we have built everything from houses to factories.  I have always enjoyed the physical work of construction and love the challenge of designing and building something.  My parents are still living.  My dad is 91 and my mom is 89.  I am most proud of my family – my son David and my daughter Tricia and their children.

Peggie Price Brown

The funniest thing that ever happened while I was at EHS. to some may not be funny, but it stands out in my mind as memorable. Mr.Jones stopped me in the hallway and said I should use my real name, Margaret, instead of your nick name ”Peggie.” I said my name is Peggie. He just laughed and said, “that is odd” and walked on down the hall.

 

My saddest memory took place when I was in study hall the day it was announced that President Kennedy was assassinated.

 

My favorite teacher was Miss Smith. I learned that the love of art (and its expression) comes in many forms and that eventually led to my career as a decorator.

 

Looking back, a fellow student that made a difference in my life was Jackie McLain. I was painfully shy in school, Jackie, asked me one day: “Do you

want to live your life this way?” Of course I didn't, so I worked at

it and changed.  Thanks, Jackie

 

As a high school senior I had envisioned myself being a secretary. After graduation I married, worked and wanted to start a family. I become a secretary and soon learned it wasn't for me Starting my family didn't happen until 3 years later. We were so thankful because we thought it may not happen.

 

Ultimately, we had two children, Christina and David. I was able to stay home with them and enjoyed every minute.  When they started school, at Geggie Elementary, I started re-inventing myself. I became a commercial and residential decorator and a building contractor, building and/or decorating homes and businesses for my extended family and a variety of clients.

 

I'm proud of my career and the recognition I have received for my talent, something I never thought possible as a senior in high school.

 

I would like to be remembered as a person who loves the Lord, is a good

wife, mother, grandmother, sister and friend. And, as a person who never worked a

day of her life because she had the nerve to follow her dream and leverage her talents.

 

 

Jackie McLain Devine

It was cold and blustery February morning following a massive snowstorm in '62 when I first set foot in EHS—my 16th "new kid" educational experience. I donned a heavy Southern accent and brought with me a set of world experiences that didn't jibe with those of my fellow classmates. As a New Orleans resident, I had already netted crawfish in the bayou, walked Canal Street and the French Quarter (and studied their historical backdrop), attended Mardi Gras parades, and flown in seaplanes across the Gulf. At that time, many of my friends were bonafide Cajuns or French Creoles. Others were first and second-generation Greek, Polish, Italian and Spanish immigrants. In Miami, shortly before the Missile Crisis, as the only Anglo in most of my classes, I was forced to adapt, survive and communicate in the role of a minority in a school dominated by Spanish speaking refugees. Clearly, I was a big city girl.

 

Many of the schools I attended covered entire city blocks. As a matter of fact, in Charlotte, NC, my huge high school football team competed weekly in a gigantic stadium in the center of town, where we were entertained by a marching band half the size of Eureka's student body. Naturally, the day I entered the little red brick schoolhouse propped high on a hilltop in Missouri, overlooking Eureka's hamlet (population around 1,000), I felt like a square peg in a round hole. What's more, I sensed that I'd never fit in with my accent, weird clothes, and strange ways. Fortunately, I was wrong.

 

First Introduction

Big Bully Gary Sutter made himself visible at the onset. He had a way of snickering and making strange noises every time we passed in the hall. On day three, still feeling self-conscious, one of Gary's unkind remarks pushed me over the edge. I simply walked down the hall and out the door, vowing never to return. Which is precisely what I was forced to do (by my mom) as soon as I reached home. Because of a forceful mother, my little tête-à-tête with Mr. Jones resolved the "Gary Sutter" issue, and we eventually became good friends (evident even in our 20th reunion video). Shortly after that incident, we were caught running down the hall together, where we blasted through the back door and broke the window. Both sets of our parents were required to pay for the damage. 

Faculty Memories: 

Even though many of our teachers seemed like old fogies to me, I'm beginning to take pity on them. After reading the stories posted here, it's apparent quite a few us didn't view our education in the proper perspective. As I look back on it, I must have thought my main focus was to show up and have fun. The truth is, I got by reasonably easy because I had good grammar, a wide vocabulary, and above-average social skills. However, that was no preparation for the university. Not only did Ms. Eisenhauer know that she attempted to embarrass me out of my complacency and make me stretch. One day she stood in the front of our biology class, looked directly at me, and said ever so clearly: "Some students in this class are very smart; they just don't take their classwork very seriously!" In the hushed silence, there was no mistaking; I was the target of her comment. 

Here I sit, 67 years old, and in my mind's eye, I can still see her delivering that message and feel those piercing eyes boring right through me! Just to set the record straight, I proved I could focus. Carol Kline and I dissected a pig brain for her (and I believe it was to her satisfaction). 

In geometry, on hot days, Ms. Pierce would let us get a drink of water from the fountain if the temperature reached 90 (I believe that was the number). Jack Clark jumped up to check right before she walked in. While he was holding a lit match under the thermometer to guarantee our day of drinking, he turned around to see her standing there. Thanks to Jack, we didn't get to wet our whistle that day. I'm not sure whether we got to for leave for a drink the remaining of the year—I think not!. Maybe some of you remember. 

 

I was in Mr. Hyde's class the day that Kennedy was shot. I can remember Mr. Jones barging into the class and mumbling something about Kennedy, then abruptly turning around and leaving. A few minutes later, he did the same thing. I think on the third attempt, we finally got the message. If someone else reading this remembers that day, please comment.

Student and friend recollections: 

I always felt Stan Dampier had an amazing ability to write. His work fascinated me. Marsha Patton's brainpower was enviable (by me). Clara Pemberton and Anita Wood could create thought-provoking poetry with minimal effort. Leslie Garard always seemed to know where she was headed and what she wanted from life. Intellectually, Woody was gifted. I felt that Ms. Johnson was very wise in selecting him for the lead part in our 11th-grade class play, "Head In The Clouds." He did an exceptional job. I remember Mary Ellen as someone easy to get to know—one of the nicest and friendliest people in our class. Mary Beth had the most beautiful hands. Bob Trejbal and Tim Cox could always make us laugh. Greg Cooper had no problem telling you exactly what he thought. And, tall and slender, Peggie Price was stunning in anything she wore. She had a knack for picking out clothing, make-up, and accessories. I feel that I was on a "first-name" one-on-one basis with almost everyone in our class. But, now, I'm inclined to believe it was "the rest of the story" (as Paul Harvey always said) that I missed, and for that, I have some regrets…

And there you have it; this concludes Part 1, Part II, in the book I am about to publish. 

 

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